All-Beethoven evening – Seen & Heard

'all sections of the orchestra embraced Gardiner’s fiery take on Beethoven as a visionary and iconoclast, with each of the works on the programme coming across as freshly-minted.'
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Triomphale at St Paul's Cathedral – Daily Telegraph

'In a concert hall this piece [Messiaen's Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum] is awesome; in the cathedral, with its six-second echo, it acquired a nimbus of the miraculous.'
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Respighi & Dallapiccola – Bachtrack

'There are moments of unearthly beauty as well as violent, percussive terror and creased claustrophobia, all summoned by Pappano and the LSO with impeccable detail and care.'
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Triomphale at St Paul's Cathedral – Bachtrack

'Peter Moore’s noble trombone solo preached eloquently in the Oraison funèbre before the closing Apothéose zipped along in a blaze of triumph, crowned by cymbal crashes and the tinkling of a Pavillon Chinois (or ‘Jingling Johnny’), all utterly bonkers but guaranteed to leave the audience grinning in delight.'
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Respighi & Dallapiccola – The Times

'The LSO hungrily inhabited a score that enfolds you in its grimy atmosphere, with brutal, militaristic scrunches alternating with desolate, thinned-out textures.'
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LSO Artist Portrait: Håkan Hardenberger – Bachtrack

'it was the sensational playing of Hardenberger that commanded attention throughout [Betsy Jolas' Histoires Vraies], not least in the many muted sequences.'
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Gabrieli, Vivaldi, Petrassi, Puccini & De Sabata – The Arts Desk

'with Pappano fine-tuning every dynamic from the near-inaudible to the briefly terrorizing, and highlighting every texture – the wind, harp and percussion scoring is especially original - the attention was held. The hand of a master [Petrassi] is evident from first note to last; it’s a work I want to hear again, and with a score, as soon as possible.'
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BMW Classics 2022 – Daily Telegraph

'Sheku Kanneh-Mason’s intimate and subtle performance of Bruch’s melancholy Kol Nidrei and Bloch’s even more melancholy Prayer from From Jewish Life wasn’t obvious outdoor fare, but it certainly held the crowd rapt. Witter-Johnson’s new piece, FAIYA!, in which most of the LSO disappeared to make way for the players from the Guildhall School and On Track, hummed and thrummed with irresistible dancing energy.'
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Lift Every Voice – The Times

'the clapping and dancing at the close suggested the spirit had descended on London EC2.'
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Haydn, Mozart, Gershwin & John Adams – The Guardian

'[Gershwin's An American in Paris] provided the LSO’s woodwind and brass with plenty of opportunities for moments of bluesy indulgence as well as some convincingly transatlantic glitz.'
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Lizst & Mahler – The i

'After two lean years, the physical thrill of a symphony whose sound swallows you whole, punches you breathless with its brass and whose finale swells into a chorale that turns a concert hall into a church was overwhelming.'
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Haydn, Mozart, Gershwin & John Adams – The Times

'The sunnily carefree demeanour of An American in Paris brought joy from start to finish, in a big-hearted LSO performance that sauntered happily between cartoon car horns, Straussian violin solos — and a bluesy trumpet turn that earned its player a handshake from the conductor.'
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Liszt & Mahler – The Observer

'Live music on this scale, requiring nearly 100 players, was all but absent in lockdown. Hard to imagine we will ever again take its presence for granted. Tilson Thomas shaped Mahler’s grand contours with clarity, yielding and reining in, without indulgence or schmaltz.'
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