Bernard Haitink at 90, Mozart & Bruckner – Daily Telegraph

Most impressive of all was the Finale, whose long digressions and mood switches can seem puzzling, but here were made to seem like tributaries of one mighty river. For sheer youthful energy, combined with unwavering grasp of the whole, I’ve rarely heard the like.
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Bernard Haitink at 90, Mozart & Bruckner – The Arts Desk

The LSO has never sounded better or greater. It helped that the strings were so quick to pick up on the lighter, more rustic modes with such character; in Carmine Lauri they have a superlative leader; last Sunday's guest, Sharon Roffman, was on the front desk with him. You could see Lauri urging attack in the powerful strokes with which the first violins adorn one big build (Haitink's long-term crescendi, as in his Lucerne Beethoven last summer, are sheer perfection). 
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – Bachtrack

Puccini’s mass isn’t the greatest work, but Pappano’s advocacy was sincere and most persuasive to crown a wonderful evening.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Mozart & Bruckner – Classical Source

The Concerto was treated with breadth and grandeur, but so well-paced as to exude a requisite grace and charm that sounded effortless. Antiphonal violins aided the lucid course of the music, with the LSO as lithe as a chamber orchestra.
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Weill, Rachmaninov & Stravinsky – Seen and Heard

A fabulous concert. Shani is a powerful – and powerfully intelligent – musician, of that there is no doubt. The world seems to be his oyster; and so it should be.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – The Times

Then came Verdi’s wonderfully idiosyncratic String Quartet in a version for full strings, at its headiest in the climactic fugal scherzo, dispatched by the LSO with a fleet precision almost beyond belief.
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Rameau, Betsy Jolas, Ravel, Poulenc – Sunday Times

Of course, anything less than absolute presentness of focus is unthinkable from Rattle, and he made every item vivid in his inimitable way.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – Classical Source

The London Symphony Chorus was splendid, as much in the big statements as in the more plangent and intimate passages, and the LSO and Pappano encouraged us to luxuriate shamelessly in the theatre of devotion.
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Rameau, Betsy Jolas, Ravel, Poulenc – Daily Telegraph

Ah, French music – so sensuously coloured, so graceful, so refreshingly free of moral seriousness. That’s the received view at least, and anyone who shares it would have been delighted by last night’s ravishingly performed concert from the LSO, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – The Arts Desk

The final Mass movement can often be an anticlimax in concert performances of such works, but Pappano made sure this one had special magic, and a reverent silence at the end.
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Rameau, Betsy Jolas, Ravel, Poulenc – Seen and Heard

Each of the five movements danced with colour, grace, and a refreshing lack of doctrinaire ‘authenticity’.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – MusicOMH

The orchestra reserved the best of its technical brilliance, though, for the rapid, wall-of-death contrapuntal passages in the final movement, which were brought off with the élan that the LSO musters so well.
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Rameau, Betsy Jolas, Ravel, Poulenc – The Arts Desk

With that swaggering trumpet once more to the fore, the LSO relished every mouthful of this gloriously sly and smart neo-classical confection: a bit like Grieg’s Holberg Suite, but with added cocaine and crème-de-menthe.
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