James MacMillan & Shostakovich – The Guardian

Noseda drove the first movement hard, setting a pace for the string fugue that would undo a lesser orchestra [...].

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Mussorgsky, Szymanowski & Tchaikovsky – Sunday Times

Clarity, decisiveness, expertise at all levels were the watchwords, and the andante cantabile horn solo, so exposed and crucial, came across beautifully in the hands of Guglielmo Pellarin.
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Mussorgsky, Szymanowski & Tchaikovsky – Classical Source

There were fine individual contributions such as Guglielmo Pellarin’s secure horn solo and Chris Richards’s sensitive clarinet.
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Kodály, MacMillan & Shostakovich – Bachtrack

Expressively immediate and with unreserved passion, Noseda’s personality lies also in his ability to bring an orchestra together into a singular force, obliging the audience to a show of contrasts and forward thrust... Thus as Noseda dug into Kodály’s Dances of Galánta in his characteristically string-heavy style, not only the rustic and rhythmic qualities, but also elements of melancholy (according to Bartók, Kodály’s music “strives for inner contemplation”) and fun were immaculately shaped. While the woodwinds too were songful and present, Andrew Marriner’s poignant clarinet was memorable, evoking something of an autumnal sunset in this early November’s approach to winter.

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De Falla & Lalo – Seen and Heard

With his [Jaime Martín's] superb, precise conducting technique, and an electric response from the LSO at its virtuosic best, this was a memorable performance.
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Mussorgsky, Szymanowski & Tchaikovsky – Seen and Heard

Philippe Jordan seemed to relish, as well he should, this Rolls-Royce of an instrument with which to play. 
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De Falla & Lalo – Bachtrack

Jaime Martín, conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, seemed determined at the outset of this party-like concert to conjure up an atmosphere of fun and celebration in true fiesta style.
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A Celebration of John Williams – The Hollywood News

Listening to the London Symphony Orchestra play John Williams’ music live is nothing short of a privilege. A joyous and emotional experience celebrating the work of quite possibly the greatest living composer in the world today.
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Smetana’s Má vlast - Barbican Centre - The Times

There is the ferocious Sarka about a warrior maiden and her bloodthirsty allies, which featured a superbly seductive clarinet solo from Andrew Marriner. 

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A Celebration of John Williams – Classical Source

The programme represented a collection of greatest hits designed to show Williams’s ability to create stirring epic themes and big open-hearted melodies. Brossé showed both his mettle and his taste and the LSO played with finesse as well as passion. 
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Smetana’s Má vlast - Barbican Centre - Classical Source

The great flowing theme of ‘Vltava’ was smooth and shining in the hands of the LSO strings, the polka a little sturdy, but the passage where the river hits the rapids was breathtakingly exciting, and the exhilaration of the up-tempo joyful version of the theme was a well-earned reward. 

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Mussorgsky, Szymanowski & Tchaikovsky – Bachtrack

It was a masterclass display of contrasts and narrative. The dramatic, lyrical, and sweet themes of the Andantino cantabile were characterfully delineated, then passed onto each other with confidence and allure.
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Janáček, Szymanowski, Sibelius - Seen and Heard International

Rattle’s beloved Sibelius concluded the concert. [...] This time round, quite simply I was on the edge of my seat, lifted by the sheer vividness of the emotive sonic pictorialism and the sense of sincere, committed celebration of this music that the LSO and Rattle communicated.

The journey from mystery to majesty was utterly compelling. The horn’s call and bassoons’ response of the opening bars seemed to sail to us direct from the still centre of a Scandinavian forest, while the timpani’s quiet trembling had a primordial and prophetic air. Vast open spaces unfolded, carrying us across landscapes and through narratives, as Rattle turned motionlessness into movement, seemingly static patterns evolving into such an organic, unstoppable impetus that by the ‘Scherzo’ we were surfing on a magic carpet of joy.

Rattle again conducted from memory; indeed, he didn’t so much as ‘conduct’ – there weren’t many indications of a ‘beat’ as such – as guide his players through a landscape that they know so well and love. But, that’s not to suggest that there was no laser-vision or attention to detail: time and again I was surprised when a gesture or glance flew lightly but commandingly in the direction of a particular player or section, with minimal means but immediate effect, coaxing a little more colour, weight, import.

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