Bernstein 1 & Mahler 1 – The Times

The orchestra bit hungrily into the ominous prelude, danced ferociously in that strange middle section, then made way for a terrifically impassioned Jamie Barton to sing verses from the book of Jeremiah. When she was in full cry you could probably hear the American mezzo-soprano from Tel Aviv.
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Bernstein 1 & Mahler 1 – Seen and Heard

Barton has a big voice, yet she phrases with intense musicality, full voiced and anguished yet tender. Solo strings from the LSO’s fine body created a web of the utmost beauty. This was a wonderful performance of a significant work that simply deserves more credit.
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Bernstein & Mahler – Financial Times

At the end the symphony blossoms in optimism, prefiguring the heart-warming end of Candide. This could be no other composer. Bernstein was a 20th-century one-off.
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Bernstein 1 & Mahler 1 – Classical Source

In this performance Alsop found plenty of depth in their declamation, the LSO string desks digging in to the Harris-like rhetoric
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Bernstein & Mahler – The Arts Desk

Alsop’s vision may have been clear, and beautifully shaped by the musicians of the LSO – strings luxuriating in the lovely melody of "Kaddish II", tuned percussion adding watery translucence to a texture blackened by sooty smudges of brass
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Bernstein 1 & Mahler 1 – Evening Standard

The orchestra came into its own in the Mahler, creating wide, sometimes wild, sonic perspectives. There were moments when the music seemed to emerge from deep underground, others when we might have been in the open air.
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Bernstein & Mahler – Classical Source

The LSO’s Adam Walker turned every mood beautifully, becoming both narrator and victim with unselfconscious identification, and Alsop and the LSO defined the orchestral role, hauntingly enlarged by solos from viola and a distant accompanying flute, with poetic tact.
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Bernstein 1 & Mahler 1 – Bachtrack

Alsop worked hard to shape the climaxes powerfully, eventually reaching exuberance when the horn section – and the fourth trombonist – rose to their feet for a triumphant close. You had a feeling Lenny would have been on his feet too.
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Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky – The Times

The London Symphony Orchestra wasn’t fazed by their demands and, in Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto paired with Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony, the results were exciting and satisfying.
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Bernstein & Mahler – The Guardian

[Marin Alsop] clearly believes passionately in the viability of the Kaddish, and like her performance of the Jeremiah Symphony, it was superbly played and sung by the LSO and its Chorus, and blazed with conviction.
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Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky – Seen and Heard

... from the moment that Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili played the opening chords of the Moderato it was as if I had never heard this concerto before.  The quietly caressed clusters heralded a performance that really did feel revelatory.
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Bernstein & Mahler – The Times

Alsop drew out its anguished melodic lines with loving care, making its climactic dissonant outbursts all the more startling. Great music, finally; and sterling music-making too.
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Eisenstein's October with live score – Classical Source

Strobel guided the LSO through the two-hour-long score with great feeling for rhythmic vitality and perfect synchronisation.
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