Britten & Mahler – Bachtrack

At the heart of the movement is the monumental solo horn part (earning principal Timothy Jones a huge ovation), complemented by Mahler's extraordinary ingenious ensemble writing for that instrument. It was simply some of the best horn playing I have ever heard live, recklessly melodic, endlessly colourful, sometimes pillow-soft.
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Britten & Mahler – The Times

...if you wanted perfection you would have heard it earlier in an astoundingly played and magnificently cogent interpretation of Britten’s early Sinfonia da Requiem.
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Stravinsky, Birtwistle & Adams – The Times

Another new signing by the orchestra, the principal trumpeter David Elton, was outstanding in his dreamy but perilous solo in the second movement. The exhilarating climax, however, was a team effort.
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Britten & Mahler – The Arts Desk

On the eve of Europe Day, with Ukrainian and Maltese violinists on the front desk (the superbly communicative Roman Simovic and Carmine Lauri), it was vital to be reminded that music-making at the highest level is truly international.
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Stravinsky, Birtwistle & Adams – Bachtrack

You couldn’t want for a more convincing performance. Every department fizzed and there was palpable sense of joy in the uninhibited orchestral fireworks, perhaps after the effort to deliver the trickier Birtwistle sound world. It was clear here that Rattle knows every note of the piece inside out and also knows how to make it swing gloriously.
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John Adams & Berlioz – Bachtrack

Throughout, Rattle made every moment of this mesmerising work tell: his direction was absolutely authoritative and the LSO demonstrated yet again, both in individual contributions as well as in its corporate virtuosity, why it is such a force to be reckoned with.
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Stravinsky, Birtwistle & Adams – Classical Source

Rattle has the ability to draw us in to such an epic score and time seemed suspended for half an hour as Birtwistle’s imagination seeped into ours.
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Britten & Mahler – Classical Source

The string lines towards the end of the ‘Requiem aeternum’ had maximal emotional clout, articulated with a Bernstein-like fervour
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Stravinsky, Birtwistle & Adams – The Independent

The London Symphony Orchestra under Simon Rattle’s direction give this three-movement work everything they’ve got
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John Adams & Berlioz – Classical Source

The opening movement’s pounding E-minor chords recall the energy of Nielsen’s ‘Espansiva’ Symphony and it was immediately clear that Rattle had the measure of the piece, played with polish and finesse.
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Stravinsky, Birtwistle & Adams – The Guardian

It’s a score that perfectly suits Rattle’s ability to focus musical energy with pinpoint accuracy, and the LSO responded with a performance of irresistible immediacy, just as they had laid out the intricacies of The Shadow of Night with astonishing clarity.
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John Adams & Berlioz – The Arts Desk

Rattle kept the 27-year-old firebrand composer in view and his model of Beethoven at bay – at least until the juiced-up finale, where bass recitatives set the scene as they do in the Ninth Symphony before throwing back the curtain not on an ode to joy but a witches’ rave, artificial stimulants courtesy of Berlioz.
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Ravel Triple Bill – The Times

The sharp slap of percussion, the mocking trombones, yawning bassoons, grazing, pinching, winking strings and swooning waltzes were impeccably balanced and shaped by Roth.
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