Ravel Triple Bill – Classical Source

I’ve been lucky enough to be on the receiving end of some outstanding music-making from the LSO, but this Ravel evening was in a league of its own, playing to any number of strengths.
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Ravel Triple Bill – Seen and Heard

The LSO achieved a shattering climax, and was rightly rewarded by highly enthusiastic applause and shouts from the audience.
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Rachmaninov, Balakriev & Shostakovich – Sunday Times

Noseda’s intense, searching, stylish realisation seemed, as I imagined it, pregnant with those 14 future symphonies, stretching in my mind’s eye like the future Scottish kings in Act IV of Macbeth.
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Beethoven & Ives – The Spectator

... at the Barbican the LSO under Mark Elder played the Second Symphony with more ebullience than any of Ives’s American proselytisers.
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Strauss & Tchaikovsky – The Times

With gleaming tone and wonderful musicality, the Ukrainian violinist sailed through the concerto’s virtuosic writing. The woodwind lines in the bittersweet Canzonetta were beautifully shaped, and Noseda whipped up irresistible energy in the finale.
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Beethoven & Ives – The Times

Five movements passed so dreamily that I would have happily heard at least one of them again.
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Strauss & Tchaikovsky – Bachtrack

...this was no empty showmanship – each repetition of the main theme was given a different colour each time, and Simović’s brilliant articulation, almost spitting out the fiendish passagework, had the audience on their feet.
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Beethoven & Ives – Bachtrack

The central sentimental Adagio around which the five-movement structure hinges was warm and well-drawn without being saccharine; its wind and brass chorales committed and open-hearted, with particularly fine playing from the LSO horn section.
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Strauss & Tchaikovsky – Seen and Heard

It would be pardonable in the circumstances to expect some lapses and some tentativeness in an entirely unrehearsed performance, but what we heard was an astonishingly confident and technically perfect delivery of the solo part and completely assured playing by the LSO, with Noseda following his soloist and guiding his orchestral forces unerringly, even when Simovic introduced some unusually marked variations of tempo in the last movement, which he took at an excitingly fast pace.
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Beethoven & Ives – Classical Source

... the quiet gossamer silkiness of the first violins was special, and getting the two trombones to stand in the closing pages for ‘Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean’, their ffff blaze cutting through the texture, was a nice bit of Mahlerian theatre.
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Strauss & Tchaikovsky – Classical Source

Noseda was supremely responsive to Simovic, the LSO responding in kind, engaging with the bravado of their colleague suddenly in the spotlight. Simovic’s playing of the middle movement was as lyrical and as reflective as one could wish for.
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Strauss & Tchaikovsky – Sunday Times

With an unrehearsed — but outstanding — orchestra and a talent of his own that took the breath away (he played from memory), the sort of spontaneous recreation of a score so lacking in the week’s previous concerto renderings was gloriously enabled.
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LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – Seen and Heard

Scriabin’s Poem of Ecstasy benefited from admirable clarity and a fine balance between the vertical and horizontal.
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