Bernard Haitink at 90: Mozart & Bruckner – The Observer

This wonderful, modest conductor’s gift is to bring out a work’s form and architecture, particularly vital for Bruckner. With a restrained flick of the baton or slight movement of a finger Haitink can trigger, from a lone horn call, an astonishing avalanche of sound.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Dvorák & Mahler – The Arts Desk

Thrumming double basses, weird forest sounds from the clarinets, second violin lines all emerged with exceptional vividness; and the pace allowed the violent explosion at the development's climax to truly haunt as a vision of destruction, the foreshadowing of the Fifth's funeral-march fanfare on low trumpets casting the shadow of death.
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Bernard Haitink at 90, Mozart & Bruckner – Daily Telegraph

Most impressive of all was the Finale, whose long digressions and mood switches can seem puzzling, but here were made to seem like tributaries of one mighty river. For sheer youthful energy, combined with unwavering grasp of the whole, I’ve rarely heard the like.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Dvorák & Mahler – Bachtrack

Haitink was aided by the most characterful woodwind team in London, limpid flutes and juicy clarinet tone especially beguiling. The powerful LSO strings were tamed by the tiniest of finger trembles from the conductor, portamentos always the decent side of tasteful, the whole thing grounded by the gruff grumbles of the terrific double bass section. Neil Percy teased the sleigh ride along buoyantly and Katy Woolley’s burnished horn solos were golden and ripe.
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Bernard Haitink at 90, Mozart & Bruckner – The Arts Desk

The LSO has never sounded better or greater. It helped that the strings were so quick to pick up on the lighter, more rustic modes with such character; in Carmine Lauri they have a superlative leader; last Sunday's guest, Sharon Roffman, was on the front desk with him. You could see Lauri urging attack in the powerful strokes with which the first violins adorn one big build (Haitink's long-term crescendi, as in his Lucerne Beethoven last summer, are sheer perfection). 
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Dvorák & Mahler – Classical Source

A heartfelt standing ovation followed, deep-bowed-to by Haitink, and the LSO, just as appreciative, had played like angels for him: Das himmlische Leben.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Mozart & Bruckner – Classical Source

The Concerto was treated with breadth and grandeur, but so well-paced as to exude a requisite grace and charm that sounded effortless. Antiphonal violins aided the lucid course of the music, with the LSO as lithe as a chamber orchestra.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Mozart & Bruckner – Bachtrack

This was a memorable concert with the sense of having witnessed something very special. At the start of the evening, Haitink came on stage to the sort of rapturous ovation which most would very happily accept at the end of a concert; two hours later, he left to little short of a hero's send-off.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – The Times

Then came Verdi’s wonderfully idiosyncratic String Quartet in a version for full strings, at its headiest in the climactic fugal scherzo, dispatched by the LSO with a fleet precision almost beyond belief.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Mozart & Bruckner – The Times

He brought out the luminosity and joy of a score inspired by a romanticised medieval world, made sense of baffling moments and left its wonderful mysteries intact.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – Classical Source

The London Symphony Chorus was splendid, as much in the big statements as in the more plangent and intimate passages, and the LSO and Pappano encouraged us to luxuriate shamelessly in the theatre of devotion.
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Bernard Haitink at 90, Mozart & Bruckner – The Guardian

This was a magisterial account, broad and unaffected as always in the familiar Haitink manner, but gradually drawing the listener ever deeper into the symphony’s interior world.
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Ponchielli, Verdi & Puccini – The Arts Desk

The final Mass movement can often be an anticlimax in concert performances of such works, but Pappano made sure this one had special magic, and a reverent silence at the end.
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