LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – Sunday Times

I hadn’t expected to be so engrossed in what at first seemed another modernist experiment. But – and thanks considerably to Roth’s insightful, Boulezianly decisive conducting (though at one climactic point he leapt into the air in true Bernsteinian fashion) — I floated in an aural ecstasy.
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Rachmaninov, Balakriev & Shostakovich – Classical Source

Noseda and the LSO met him more than halfway in a magnificent performance that made the brilliant scoring sizzle with life and played up the work’s emotional strengths and ambiguities.
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LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – Daily Telegraph

Boldly going where (almost) no orchestra has gone before, the London Symphony Orchestra last night shattered the concert format in the most thrilling and enjoyably anarchic way.
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Rachmaninov, Balakriev & Shostakovich – Bachtrack

The LSO was on pungent form, tucking into Shostakovich’s youthful score with relish.
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Bernard Haitink at 90: Dvorák & Mahler – Mail on Sunday

Then Haitink stood up, his left hand supplementing his vigorous right-hand beat, with detailed gestures to the orchestra to enhance expression. If anything, this gloriously vivid and vigorous performance was even more edgy than that recording from 1968. At 90, Bernard Haitink is still at the top of his game. Amazing.
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Rachmaninov, Balakirev & Shostakovich – Seen and Heard

Iron rhythmic control, a no-slow policy for treacherous passages that tax even the greatest and a real sense of cumulative energy meant the finale was the perfect blend of intellect, emotion and excitement.
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LSO Artist Portrait: Barbara Hannigan – Classical Source

It was awesome and voluptuous, and as she pushed ‘I got rhythm’ into the stratosphere, it was clear she would take no prisoners, a plan predictably greeted with a standing ovation. What a girl!
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LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – Bachtrack

It was nonetheless a sometimes electrifying and for many deeply affecting experience – looking around at the closing, swelling heights of the piece, many had been brought to tears.
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LSO Artist Portrait: Barbara Hannigan – Financial Times

On the chutzpah scale this knew no bounds. What next at the LSO? How about an opera duets evening with Simon Rattle, hopefully in his best voice?
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LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – The Guardian

The rest of the evening was more conventional – an LSO programme conducted by François-Xavier Roth that ended with a diaphanous account of Scriabin’s Poem of Ecstasy with exactly the slow-burn quality the piece needs
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LSO Artist Portrait: Barbara Hannigan – Bachtrack

Not surprisingly, the LSO was in its element, displaying its long pedigree in musical theatre, effortlessly translating the vibes coming from Hannigan’s gently swaying body into the most beguiling rhythmic diversions, and then, for the penultimate stanza of “Embraceable You”, adding with its own collective voice suitable reinforcements to the vocal line.
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LSO Futures: Lang, Manoury, Shin, Scriabin – The Times

The final hurrah was Scriabin’s purple-hued Poem of Ecstasy, beautifully controlled by Roth and the LSO’s coruscating woodwind until David Elton’s trumpet finally let rip and a flood of sound was unleashed.
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LSO Artist Portrait: Barbara Hannigan – Seen and Heard

The capacity Barbican Hall audience gave Hannigan an ecstatic reception, leaping instantly to their feet. It was impossible not to smile.
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